Fly Fishing the Little Juniata River

Hatch Chart

Common Name (Hook Size) FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT
Blue Quill (16-18)  
Black Caddis (16)  
Blue-Winged Olive (14-22)        
Quill Gordon (12 – 14)      
Grannom (12)    
Green Caddis (14)    
Sulphur (14 -16)    
Cahill (14)    
Tan Caddis (14- 16)    
Green Drake (8-10)    
Brown Drake (8-10)    
Slate Drake (12-14)      
Trico (22 – 24)      
White Mayfly (14 – 16)      
Terrestrials            
Midge (24-18)                  

The Little Juniata River flows south from Tyrone to Petersburg. Upriver from Tyrone, the river can seem marginal at best. The only exception to this is where the main stem of the river picks up productive tributaries, such as Tipton and Bells Gap. Downriver from Tyrone, the river narrows and becomes surrounded by large limestone cliffs. Past this point, the river becomes a limestone river, with at least ten limestone springs being added to the river as it flows. These increase the insect population and make for a large trout population. Limestone helps to keep the flow of the river moderate, and provides moderate temperatures.

If you want to fish the river from Barree to Spruce Creek, the only access is on foot. On this section of the river, which is four miles long, there are 15-foot deep pools, heavy hatches and productive riffles and lots of wild trout. From Barree to Petersburg, the river is wider and contains fewer trout. Be careful wading in the lower end on this section, because pools can be deep.

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