How to get stuck fishing rods sections apart.

Stuck fly fishing rod sections… Not good.

I have broken fishing rods by trying to get the stuck sections apart. Breakage is usually due to bending and over stressing the sections. The easiest remedy is to have a buddy help you pull it apart. This is accomplished by each person placing one hand on opposing sections and their other hand on the sections closest to them. Next, have only one participant pull while the other holds steady. This approach helps even the pressure and reduce stress on the rod sections.

Make sure you do NOT hold the rod sections by the guides and/or twist – they will crack the at the guide wraps, break, or bend.

If you do break a section hopefully you have your emergency kit with you to get you through. Of course, as the video demonstrates freezing the sections at the junction will greatly help. It’s a life saver if you are trying this solo.

Although bamboo is the sweetheart by fly rod aficionados and considered by casual anglers as the first fly rod material used centuries ago. Dr Andrew N. Herd[1], documents the first written account of a fly rod can be found “in Ælian’s Natural History, probably written about 200 A.D.” The earliest rods were made from a tree limb approximately 6 feet long. A technical account of rod building is found in Dame Juliana Berners, The Treatyse of Fishing with an Angle. Preparation started with choosing the limb of hazel, willow, or ash. This elaborate rod building process included “soak[ing] it in a hot oven”, tying it to a beam and drying for a month. It was fairly sophisticated, the rod was comprised of two sections that were meant to be taken apart for traveling inconspicuously, “with a spike in the lower end fastened with a catch so that you can take your top section in and out …And so you will make yourself a rod so secret that you can walk with it, and no one will know what you are doing.” The top section was made from a whippy limb, “shoot of blackthorn, crabtree, medlar, or juniper” and tapered by shaving. Braided horse hair fly line was then attached to complete the outfit.

[1] www.flyfishinghistory.com/aelian.htm

One thought on “How to get stuck fishing rods sections apart.”

  1. My grandfather from Potter County and my father both had Heddon split bamboo rods with aluminum ferrules – I’ve got one of theirs probably from the 1940s. He would rub the male end in his hair to add a little oil before assembling. If stuck, place the rod behind your knees, grab the rod on the outside of your knees flush against your knees – your thumbs are tight against your knees – and slowly spread your legs while holding tight. Be careful not to bend the rod. Works every time.

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